My Bookshelf

Nature books are a great way to reconnect with our natural world. Here's some inspiration, what have you been reading?

WILDING

By Isabella Tree

When eco anxiety threatens to overwhelm you, pick up Wilding to listen to a story of success.

THE MOST PERFECT THING

By Tim Birkhead

A detailed exploration of what we know (and don't know) about birds' eggs. If ever you feel your awe at the wonder of the natural world fading, pick up this book.

DIVIDED

By Tim Marshall

Accessible enough for those new to geopolitics but detailed enough to interest those who know more, Divided is a great read for anyone interested in why the world behaves the way it does.

BITCH

By Lucy Cooke

Have we, in our devotion to Darwin, been perpetuating biased and therefore unscientific views for more than a century? In Bitch Lucy Cooke reveals that yes, we have.

THE NEW MAP

By Daniel Yergin

If your aim is to engage with climate issues in a meaningful way, then context is critical. Books like this one, covering the geopolitics of energy and climate recovery, are vital reading.

BACK TO NATURE

By Chris Packham and Megan McCubbin

A great book if you’re looking for an informal introduction to conservation and natural history.

THE BOOK OF TRESPASS

By Nick Hayes

The public are excluded from 92% of the land in England, and from 97% of our waterways. Can you truly love and connect with a country when you can only hope to see or experience 8% of it?

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING

By Delia Owens

A story about loneliness and the power of the natural world, heart-breaking and heart-warming in equal measure.

GATHERING MOSS

By Robin Wall Kimmerer

For a grounding, mindful way to connect with the natural world take this book to somewhere mossy.

BRAIDING SWEETGRASS

By Robin Wall Kimmerer

This review is a love letter. Read this book and let love, gratitude, and wonder for the natural world wash over you.

THE WREN: A BIOGRAPHY

By Stephen Moss

A love letter to the wren – one that you can visit time and time again to learn something new about these precious little birds.

THERE IS NO PLANET B

By Mike Berners-Lee

A book that contains some insightful analysis, but is loaded towards opinion rather than fact.

AWAY WITH THE PENGUINS

By Hazel Prior

Easy reading with an important message and a protagonist who will capture your heart, this is a book to read with a hot chocolate in front of the fire.

THE TWELVE BIRDS OF CHRISTMAS

By Stephen Moss

This is a fantastic book to dip into over the festive period – keep it close by as you wait for guests, wrap presents, and wait impatiently for the roast to cook.

SECRETS OF A DEVON WOOD

By Jo Brown

The pages are so beautiful that this book would make a great bedside of coffee table book, if only it were possible to put it down.

THE WILD PLACES

By Robert Macfarlane

I’ve only heard good things about Robert Macfarlane’s writing so let me tell you: I must have picked up the wrong book.

REBIRDING

By Benedict Macdonald

Rebirding is an in-depth look at the space we have in the UK and what we could achieve if we used just a small percentage of that space to bring wildlife back.

ELEGY FOR A RIVER

By Tom Moorhouse

Reading Moorhouse’s story is like being down the pub with a research ecologist. An entertaining introduction to water voles and white clawed crayfish.

ROCK POOL

By Heather Buttivant

If you want a holiday full of wonder and new discoveries, take Rock Pool by Heather Buttivant to a rocky shore in the UK and marvel at everything she reveals to you.

FINDING THE MOTHER TREE

By Suzanne Simard

Suzanne Simard tells the story of how she and her teams made discoveries that changed the way we look at trees forever.

INGLORIOUS

By Mark Avery

Should we have an outright ban on driven grouse shooting? Mark Avery thinks so.

SKYLARKS WITH ROSIE

By Stephen Moss

Encouraging people to care about exotic, endangered animals is one thing; inspiring people to find the joy in the everyday is quite another altogether – and something Moss does very well. 

WHO OWNS ENGLAND?

By Guy Shrubsole

Understanding land ownership is critical to the success of conservation action in England. Shrubsole gives us the lowdown.